Why regulation is a financial services PR pro’s best friend

There’s no doubt about it: the financial services world is in an Age of Regulation. The debate over increased regulatory oversight within the myriad financial services sectors has raged on for years, but with considerably more vigor since the financial […]


25 Jul
by Aspectus PR

regulation-compliance-financial-servicesThere’s no doubt about it: the financial services world is in an Age of Regulation. The debate over increased regulatory oversight within the myriad financial services sectors has raged on for years, but with considerably more vigor since the financial crisis at the end of the last decade.

While many companies in the financial services sector scramble to get their ducks in a row in the face of regulations that are increasing in both number and complexity, PR professionals have a great opportunity to prove their value.

With FATCA (July 1, 2014) and AIFMD (transitional period ending July 22, 2014) – the two majors to come into effect in recent weeks – there is a huge audience out there for content providing guidance and best practice on how best to journey the road to compliance.

The sheer number of regulatory deadlines, milestones and anniversaries provides plenty of reasons for PR pros to connect their clients with reporters interested in writing about topics that affect their readers and who are looking to speak with those that are knowledgeable and can offer first-hand experience in compliance.

In recent months, Aspectus PR’s clients have spoken about regulatory topics ranging from how effective data management is essential in FATCA compliance, to the importance of transparency in regulating global FX markets, to tips for preparing for your first SEC examination, among others.

Much of this client coverage came down to just a few key things to remember:

  • Keep track of deadlines and go-live dates for important industry regulation
  • Speak with your clients regularly about the issues and challenges they face; after all, if they are facing these tests, it’s likely that others in the industry are as well
  • Get out ahead of breaking news by having different client views at the ready. That way, key reporters know that they have an expert source the moment they need them – regardless of the angle taken

Whether it’s FATCA, AIFMD, the JOBS Act, Dodd-Frank or the Volcker Rule, regulation can be a blessing in disguise for those PR professionals ready and waiting to offer their clients up as experts once the news hits.


Examining the many faces of content marketing

Last Thursday, Aspectus PR headed to the Institute of Education’s Logan Hall near Russell Square in London for the Content Marketing Show. Organised by Kelvin Newman at Rough Agenda, the twice-yearly event examines the good, the bad and the ugly […]


21 Jul
by Aspectus PR

Content-marketing-show-2014Last Thursday, Aspectus PR headed to the Institute of Education’s Logan Hall near Russell Square in London for the Content Marketing Show. Organised by Kelvin Newman at Rough Agenda, the twice-yearly event examines the good, the bad and the ugly of content marketing in rapid-fire sessions delivered by professionals drawn from across the media industry.

The core theme underpinning the show was the human aspect of social media. Captured succinctly in the form of an infographic produced by Clicky Media, it was brought to life by Axonn’s Fergus Parker in the Content Marketing Yearbook 2014: Highlights and Low-lifes – an irreverent look at those that succeeded and those that didn’t quite pull it off.

Personas featured strongly, with Tanglewood’s Raph Goldberg delivering an interesting take on using archetypes in video marketing strategies, and a brilliant presentation by Andrew Tipp at Suffolk County Council as to why thinking like a poker player will make you a better content marketer.

Goldberg explained how the types of person and stories hardwired into our minds act as a kind of filing system that enable us to quickly identify new characters or stories without really thinking about it. The same mechanism, he argued, applies in video, where brands can employ archetypes to instantly identify and resonate with their target audience – an essential aspect given that people decide whether they’re going to watch a video within the first 10 seconds.

Similarly, Tipp took the audience through the typical personas usually found round a poker table – and how content marketers must avoid the tactics of the reckless cowboy and look to the example set by the analytical maverick by creating an original strategy for every single game and not relying on branded templates. Most of all, he concluded: don’t persist with content ideas that aren’t winning. In other words, know when to hold’em and when to fold’em.

The most powerful session was delivered by Ketchum’s Stephen Waddington, who began the show by asking whether brands can be social as media shifts from mass forms of communication to social forms of communication. He argued that this shift has created an awkward disconnect for brands looking to get involved in the conversation. Comparing the social web to a party, where brands are the guests, he drew some telling character analogies:

  • ‘Nice but dim’ – e.g. those brands trying to get involved with the World Cup but who have nothing to do with football (trying to be cool but just not)
  • The ‘nutters’ – brands that appear almost psychopathic in their attempts to insert themselves into the conversation but lacking any form of empathy
  • ‘Auto mate’ – brands wedded to content calendars and robotically pushing out content with limited engagement

He warned against attempts to ‘automate the conversation’ using industrial-scale tools, and urged brands to be brave and recognise that social media is intrinsically human.

Waddington also drew on a deeply personal experience of how he used social media to carefully manage communications with friends, family, and his Facebook network after his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. Thankfully, his wife is well on the way to recovery, but it was an incredibly powerful way to illustrate how social media can break down barriers and bring people together.


Data protection laws create tangled web for international businesses

Summer 2014 has seen a raft of data and consumer protection laws come into effect around the world. These are adding layers of operational complexity for organisations that are subject to them, and puzzlement for agencies entrusted with policing the […]


18 Jul
by Aspectus PR
Current Google Image

Summer 2014 has seen a raft of data and consumer protection laws come into effect around the world. These are adding layers of operational complexity for organisations that are subject to them, and puzzlement for agencies entrusted with policing the rules. Predictably enough, the confusion over the laws has been met with derision from sections of the media.

Firstly, there was the EU ruling on the right to be forgotten where Google was forced to comply by removing a search result relating to an outdated bankruptcy.

This opened quite the can of worms, as the company was inundated with removal requests. Most notably, BBC economics editor Robert Peston complained that a 2007 story he’d written had been ‘cast into oblivion’ when it was apparently removed from search results following a request. Links to that story and others noted by the Guardian were subsequently reinstated, with Google citing teething troubles to account for the confusion.

At the heart of the issue, as Danny Sullivan succinctly points out in Search Engine Land, is the notion that Google is under no obligation to comply with requests because it could be reasonably argued that it isn’t in a position to make a judgement to balance the right to be forgotten with the right of free speech. Individual requests could (and should) be passed to arbiters in the locality of a dispute who would be better qualified to decide what action should be taken based on the EU’s ruling – after which Google might more legitimately remove search results.

Should this hypothesis come to bear, there are further issues to muddy the waters. The ruling applies to EU countries, so removed articles may still be ranked and viewable in non-European regions. Also, it is likely that a result is only ‘removed’ for a selected number of keywords such as someone’s name, rather than Google removing entire pages from its index. Given that Google ‘removed’ and ‘restored’ Peston’s story pretty quickly, it’s evident that the URL Google had indexed hadn’t been permanently expunged.

Canada also dipped its toe into online consumer protection with the rollout of its anti-spam law at the start of July. It is particularly newsworthy as firms can face fines of up to $10 million should they fall foul of the new law. Controversially, it states that an email could be considered spam if the recipient hadn’t consented to its delivery.

Such complexity means that the body responsible for its enforcement – the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission – had to clarify its position, stating that it has a ‘range of enforcement tools available to it, from warnings to penalties‘. Certainly, this is a clear example of the headache caused by enforcing legislation on the web, which by its nature, is unfenced and global.

Singapore’s new Personal Data Protection Act also came into force at the start of July. Notably, its intent and wording – ‘Organisations may collect, use or disclose personal data only for purposes that would be considered appropriate to a reasonable person in the given circumstances’ – is clearer than others that have been enacted recently. However, the ramifications could be significant for Singapore and businesses looking to operate there due to its importance as a gateway to business in Asia.

Ultimately, firms must be alert to the potential risks posed by the increasingly complex regulation relating to data protection and the web, ensure they have practical policies in place, and that these policies are communicated clearly throughout their organisation to ensure compliance.


Why there’s so much more to PR than newsjacking for security companies

The technology market place is jam-packed with security companies. And with the NSA revelations fuelling growth and sparking new ideas, both hot new start-ups and established firms are jostling for business and looking to attract mega bucks from investors, writes […]


17 Jul
by Aspectus PR

cyber-security-prThe technology market place is jam-packed with security companies. And with the NSA revelations fuelling growth and sparking new ideas, both hot new start-ups and established firms are jostling for business and looking to attract mega bucks from investors, writes Aspectus PR’s Sophie Hodgson.

The reason is simple. Unlike the rest of the world, hackers weren’t subject to austerity measures or cost cutting. Indeed, cybercrime is believed to cost $445bn to the global economy, making it more lucrative than the drugs trade. So whilst enterprises were cutting IT budgets, hackers have been investing their most prized resource – their time – into evolving their methods and digital weapons armoury.

Stories relating to hacks, attacks and data privacy happen pretty much every day. And security companies fire out comment on these latest developments to the waiting media. The problem is that whilst the newsjack is an excellent PR tactic for achieving high volume coverage across multiple online and offline assets, it also creates a shouting match. One day you might win, with your company name in lights across national, broadcast and social media channels. The next day you might be lucky to get one small snippet in an industry forum. And from a PR perspective, you’re only as good as your last piece of coverage, tweet, or LinkedIn post.

Don’t get me wrong, I love a newsjack (or rapid response, issues response, issues hijacking, whatever the term you use). There’s nothing better than sniffing out a breaking news story and getting your client’s comment out there. And yet, I wonder just how valuable it actually is for security companies.

With so many businesses wanting to be heard, is it actually helping security companies to affect behaviour, increase brand awareness or create meaningful engagement that drives the bottom line? Moreover, with hacks now a common part of everyday life, are CISOs or IT Directors even reading about them or are they as effective as the graphic pictures on cigarette packets at deterring hardened smokers?

The simple fact is that PR has to work harder and smarter than ever before. The newsjack will always hold a place in my heart, but frankly I can’t help feeling that with some boldness and daring there’s real scope to disrupt the conversation with smarter, snappier and more creative campaigns that really pack a punch.


Wearing thin: Is wearable tech an ethical nightmare for PR and comms professionals, asks CIPR

The CIPR hosted a debate last week at the House of Commons on the implications of wearable technology and how such devices raise ethical concerns around the potential use of the data they provide for marketing and PR purposes. However, […]


16 Jul
by Aspectus PR

The CIPR hosted a debate last week at the House of Commons on the implications of wearable technology and how such devices raise ethical concerns around the potential use of the data they provide for marketing and PR purposes. However, these devices pose the same kind of challenges as many current technologies do, argues Aspectus PR’s Garry Dix.

CIPR debate on wearable techLast Monday saw the CIPR ask whether or not ‘wearable technology is an ethical nightmare for PR, marketing and communication professionals’, with two teams of speakers arguing for and against the motion.

Set in the debating rooms of the House of Commons, the initial excitement of machine guns and metal detectors preceded an equally lively debate on how public relations might approach this next generation of technology.

Starting with the UK arrival of Google Glass (and the guiltily enjoyable moniker of ‘Glassholes’ for users), the debate commenced by stating that wearables are no longer a minority subject. The smart watch war is said to have reached levels akin to that in the mobile phone space, while health bands are selling by the ton.

But while the wearable sector is now a legitimate force in the tech industry, curiously there has yet to be any closer examination of the technology’s PR and marketing potential. Nevertheless, these sectors stand to be significantly changed by the widespread implementation of wearable communications technology.

Arguing that the PR wearables nightmare is soon to be very real was Stephen Davies , the founder of Substantial, Bionicly and Digital Health, alongside Neville Hobson of NevilleHobson.com. Countering their argument was Stephen Waddington, president of the CIPR, and Claire Walker, Chief Executive of Firefly Communications. The speeches were well researched, with seemingly irrefutable points swiftly countered, leaving the audience split fairly equally by the time the vote was cast. The motion was opposed 55 to 28 (i.e. not a nightmare), but somehow we didn’t leave feeling completely certain either way.

Personally, I declined the motion; to me it seems that although ethical quandaries may arise with the adoption of wearable tech, this will be no different to the application of ethics to email lists, blogs, Twitter or smartphones – all technologies that have been adopted widely. With each iteration of new technology, a rogue faction will inevitably try to use them for unscrupulous means, and this is by no means limited to PR and comms.

A statement from the floor session after the main speeches said that the motion will not apply to ‘highly skilled PR professionals’, which struck a chord with many in the room. If PR, marketing and communication professionals act just like that – professional – then wearable tech shouldn’t pose any additional problems over and above that of the previous generations of technology. After all, why record someone sneakily with your Google Glass if you can just stick a dictaphone in your pocket?


B2B social media trends coming to a PR campaign near you

New social platforms or tools seem to be emerging with increasing regularity. Designed to help us engage better and be more in tune with what’s going on in the world around us, social tools were initially geared towards consumers – […]


11 Jul
by Aspectus PR

Google HangoutsNew social platforms or tools seem to be emerging with increasing regularity. Designed to help us engage better and be more in tune with what’s going on in the world around us, social tools were initially geared towards consumers – with people tweeting about where they were and what they were doing, and using Instagram or Flickr to share photos of where they were and what they were eating (and sometimes you wished they hadn’t).

But now, businesses around the globe are exploring what social tools mean for them, and how corporate awareness, key messaging and breaking news can be shared through these channels. Although it’s still relatively early days for corporates in the world of social, many businesses are now posting timely and creative news, videos and photos to influence customer sentiment and drive interaction.

Here are the top social media tools we expect to take off for business-to-business (B2B) communications in the not-too-distant future:

Google+

There’s not a whole lot that’s new about Google+, but what is new is businesses using the Hangouts feature to talk to the public about industry news, trends and company news. The downside to a Hangout is that only 10 people (or computers) are able to participate at any one time. However, a Hangout automatically creates a YouTube video that can be placed on the company’s webpage and shared.

This presents a huge opportunity for corporate CEOs to get a clear message out to their constituents that makes the company seem more approachable. In addition, companies can host online user groups and forums with other industry leaders to discuss breaking news and trends in the market – again making it easier for their customers and the public to engage.

Pinterest

Many people are still of the mindset that Pinterest is for consumers only. Yes, it’s still a great site for do-it-yourself projects, fashion, wedding décor and more, but a growing number of firms are starting to harness the power of image sharing. Businesses geared toward consumers like the Four Seasons, Tory Burch and others have already mastered image sharing, but Pinterest is starting to make itself more friendly and easy to use for corporations with a more “professional” tone.

For example, businesses can create their own press room on Pinterest to share press releases, executive photos, infographics, demos and even blog postings. With an increasing number of studies showing that images and videos garner more engagement then plain text news, businesses can’t afford to ignore social channels like Pinterest any longer.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is already established as the “social networking site for professionals”. However, there are several useful features that many businesses are still unaware of. For example, LinkedIn allows up to three free backlinks per account that are open to indexing by Google. This means that employees and connections sharing posts related to the business can easily drive corporate websites higher in search engine results.

Naturally, with such a wide range of social tools available today, firms should always consider their goals and put a plan in place before embarking on a grand social media campaign. But with clear-cut guidelines and objectives (not to mention the support of an agency that truly understands this space), businesses are sure to have more success.


Women in PR, shout louder says Sophie Hodgson

Women in business, women in tech, women in PR – the list of ‘awards’ for women is seemingly endless. Am I the only one who finds it all, well, a bit boring? We’re not awarding men and patting them on […]


11 Jul
by Aspectus PR

Women in business, women in tech, women in PR – the list of ‘awards’ for women is seemingly endless. Am I the only one who finds it all, well, a bit boring?

Aspectus PR

We’re not awarding men and patting them on the back for being male and successful, so why are we doing the same to women. And before you start shouting at your computer, I do get that women in many industries have to fight against the system and tackle a ‘boys club’ that is unfair and doesn’t reward them for their talents and abilities. I just don’t think, in my experience, that PR is one of them. By creating women-only awards, I question what we are achieving? We demand to be treated as equals and then underline our differences with such lists and parties to which the boys are not invited.

The ‘women in…’ debate is one that has raged for years and we have men fighting our corner as well. I particularly liked Derek Du Preez’s take on the battles women face in Silicon Valley – or indeed more established tech firms. The apologies that they feel must be made for having children and therefore not being able to work every single hour of the day, just most of them. It’s a great piece and well written, yet something about it jars with me. At a time when women have more role models than ever, such as Kathryn Parsons and Hermione Way, calling out that we’re different just seems, well, awkward.

It’s no secret that I firmly believe you make your own opportunities in life. I blogged a few years ago about sexism in PR and whether or not it really existed – the crux of my argument was that women should man-up (so to speak) and crack on. Fast forward to 2014 and I’m now a mother and still working in PR, so do I still hold firm on my original argument?

Yes, actually. I was at a gathering last week for an event in a few weeks that will look at culture in tech agencies and one of the other speakers stated that while women were better at PR, men were pushier and prepared to shout louder. Nobody contradicted him and it got me thinking about whether the fact that there are more men in management positions in PR is because women simply aren’t putting ourselves forward enough?

Life does not fall into your lap. You have to go out and grab it with both hands. Think your boss is sexist and it’s limiting your new potential? Find a new one or become your own. It can be hard to stick your neck out, terrifying in fact. But now I have kids (okay, one) the biggest singular lesson my daughter has taught me is how to be fearless. She isn’t scared of anything (if you don’t include vegetables) and I truly believe there is a lesson to be learned here.

I’m not saying that women’s achievements shouldn’t be celebrated and yes, of course, there’s a need for more diversity but I just desperately wish things were in OUR hands, not those of the numerous list makers. Perhaps I am naive or perhaps, just perhaps, we need to reclaim a childish attribute lost many years ago and see where it takes us.


Capturing the communications opportunity for carbon capture and storage

Much has been made of the potential for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Europe’s evolving energy mix. However, its progress has stalled in recent years with concerns around cost, complexity and potential health risks. Last week, members of the […]


10 Jul
by Aspectus PR

CCS ETI lecture 2014

Much has been made of the potential for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Europe’s evolving energy mix. However, its progress has stalled in recent years with concerns around cost, complexity and potential health risks.

Last week, members of the Aspectus PR Energy team attended the Energy Institute lecture ‘CSS: Developing a cost-effective scheme for the UK’. Delivered by Andrew Green of the Energy Technology Institute (ETI), the lecture put forth an analysis of CCS’s current position in the UK, as well as its possible role in the future.

Green highlighted some interesting results from the ETI’s Energy System Modelling Environment (ESME): a pathway optimisation model focussing on long-term pathways to predict how the energy industry will look further out. It predicts that CCS has the potential to save the UK’s power industry £30 billion by 2050.

Moreover, the CCS Association believes the technology could create 100,000 UK jobs by 2030 and cut CO2 emissions by a third by 2050.

2,000 of these jobs are expected to stem from a regional CCS hub in North East England, the creation of which moved one step closer on Monday with the announcement of up to €300 million funding for the country’s flagship White Rose project located in Yorkshire. The funding, from the European Commissions’NER300 clean energy programme, is a crucial part of the puzzle of how to get CCS up and running in the UK, though the developers point out that its success is still contingent on the government implementing supportive market mechanisms and incentives.

However, the Yorkshire project is the exception. The broader CCS story is one of various PR disasters across Europe in recent years and has resulted in an untrusting public and caution from investors. Certainly, the CCS industry’s failure to educate the public and win friends has created a hostile environment.

For example, the ROAD project in the Netherlands has been left scrambling for the final €130 to €150 million in investment it requires – a drop in the ocean when compared to most large energy infrastructure project budgets – and you can’t help but wonder whether a more amiable atmosphere might have greased the wheels a little and helped pull in those final few Euros.

Certainly, it’s clear that in order for CCS to realise its potential in the UK, it needs better support from a PR and communications perspective. Targeting potential investors, businesses, and the general public with campaigns that both promote its benefits and allay fears about the risks, would go a long way to liberating CCS from its current commercial hiatus.


Facebook breaks communications’ golden rule with study scandal

Facebook’s recently revealed study in ‘emotional contagion’ provoked angry responses from many internet users – and a pending enquiry from the Information Commissioner’s Office. This latest controversy is a clear example of the fractious relationship between websites, their users, and […]


08 Jul
by Aspectus PR

FacebookFacebook’s recently revealed study in ‘emotional contagion’ provoked angry responses from many internet users – and a pending enquiry from the Information Commissioner’s Office. This latest controversy is a clear example of the fractious relationship between websites, their users, and personal information. The response from the company not only showed a lack of understanding and empathy, but is a textbook example of how not to respond to a crisis, says Aspectus PR’s Garry Dix.

A golden rule in the realm of communications is: always listen to your user base (even when you’re in their bad books). Having long been seen as an entity so powerful and omnipresent that it could (for the most part) do as it pleased, Facebook broke that rule by conducting a study in which it manipulated news feed content. While no stranger to controversy regarding its use of personal data, the move from focusing on income generation to the manipulation of emotions seemed to reach new levels of unwanted intimacy.

By creating filters to identify positive and negative lexis, its researchers used a sample of roughly 700,000 Facebook users, and split them into either seeing a predominantly negative or positive news feed, before analysing their posts to see if there mood had been altered. The results were statistically significant [read: really quite small], but regardless of the result size, the fact it had any sway on the posts of people cued criticism regarding informed consent, the process of peer-reviewed research and the involvement of minors and users with mental illness that might have been negatively affected by a miserable-looking news feed.

When contacted by Forbes‘ Kashmir Hill for a statement, Facebook’s initial response mainly dealt with the legality of the study, as opposed to its ethics – a statement described by Hill as ‘a bit tone deaf’. Mentioning the ‘strong internal review process’ and that the experiment ran for only ‘a single week in 2012’, the statement leaves the impression that Facebook’s PR team was having the week off.

For a heavyweight the size of Facebook – especially one found within the realm of social media – the response seems to hint at a distancing between themselves and the small team responsible for the two-year-old study. Belatedly, COO Sheryl Sandberg admitted that ‘the company communicated very badly on the emotions study’, and Adam Kramer, who co-authored the research report, stated he and his co-authors were ‘very sorry’ for the anxiety caused.

Admirable though these apologies may be, they do beg the question as to why these individuals’ sentiments weren’t found in the initial response from Facebook.

This story is the latest in a consistently growing collection regarding data ownership and privacy with major companies. The use of consumers’ private data by websites and companies entrusted with said information is fuelling the Personal Information Management Systems (PIMS) sector. Amir Mizroch reports in the Wall Street Journal that data as a commodity is leading to the PIMS sector rapidly expanding. He quotes recent projections by Ctrl-Shift that the sector could be one day be worth £16.5 billion in the UK alone. Services such as personal ‘data vaults’, and cloud companies like the Respect Network that allows people to trade their data with companies for added space, are on the increase as the full value of online information is slowly realised by the people who are its source.

For somebody in their early twenties, these latest controversies surrounding online data leave me in an uncomfortable position. The internet and specifically social media sites are an intrinsic part of my daily life. I’ve happily swapped data with Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to name but a few – a transaction based on trust and a belief that they have a duty of care towards it. From trivial social posts to vital information regarding my graduation and the ticking countdown on my exam-period library fines, there doesn’t seem to be a way to function without the internet being used in some form or another. So has my trust finally been broken?

In the words of Rachel Savage in Management Today ‘I will keep feeding the beast, however begrudgingly’.


Only the strong survive: thought leadership in the asset management age of natural selection

The recent explosion of low-cost passive strategies and the growing interest in alternative investments is reshaping the traditional model of money management. According to a recent KPMG report, this evolution – coupled with new technology, demographic shifts and changing social […]


23 Jun
by Aspectus PR

thought-leadership-asset-managementThe recent explosion of low-cost passive strategies and the growing interest in alternative investments is reshaping the traditional model of money management. According to a recent KPMG report, this evolution – coupled with new technology, demographic shifts and changing social habits – will lead to half of the firms in the global asset management industry ‘dying off’ by 2030.

In this asset management world of ‘natural selection’, the strong will survive by attracting assets – and assets will flow to those managers that differentiate themselves by highlighting the strengths of their strategies and demonstrating that they understand the current challenges their investors are facing.

This is why thought leadership, a term often misused and misunderstood, has become such an important tactic in an investment manager’s arsenal. It allows them to stand out from their competitors, increase brand equity, generate new business and open gateways to the consultant community, as well as helping to establish them as a leader in a specific market.

Bill Gross, founder and CIO of PIMCO, is a prime example. His monthly Investment Outlook, coupled with the frequently published insights of his diverse team of investment professionals, has helped transform his company into the definitive authority on bonds. Even as the firm’s flagship fund has leaked assets over the last year, the firm’s insight is followed religiously. BlackRock and GMO have also employed thought leadership to command a strong share of voice amongst their peers.

Given the experience of the financial services team here at Aspectus PR in developing content for managers and others, we see four elements at the center of any impactful thought leadership campaign:

  • Boldness – true thought leaders always speak their mind. Take a risk and don’t be afraid to give a prediction. Even Bill Gross misses the mark (from time to time).
  • Consistency – once a year just won’t cut it. Make it monthly and people will be much less likely to forget you.
  • Fund-fireTransparency – equals trust. Investors now want to understand the inner workings of the strategies in which their money is being put to work. So let them in and their trust will grow. A recent FundFire video interview with the CIO of a US pension fund supports this proposition by stating that a manager’s ability to articulate its strategy heavily influences manager selection.
  • Dialogue – use your thought leadership program as a forum. If your investors have burning questions, take the time to address them. A two-way dialogue is a proven way to gain trust and make you stand out.

Naturally, asset managers can also benefit greatly from strategic guidance to ensure that they are thinking critically, that the writing is high quality, and that their content is being distributed to the right audience through the appropriate channels. It’s never too late to adapt.